Inside My Brain

Thoughts about startups, tech, marketing, and life

CATEGORY: Business

When patience and perseverance can be bad traits to have

Patience and perseverance are excellent traits to have. But in certain situations, you don’t want to wait too long, or endure for too much time.

I wrote a post a while ago about how raising a kid is like running a startup, and I find that patience and perseverance can apply to both as well.

Being patient with your child is a virtue.

There will be times where your kid throws tantrums and just does things that she shouldn’t be doing. Over and over and over again. Or if you’re sleep training your kid and she just cries and cries and cries and sounds like she may never go to sleep.

And you might lose your cool.

Being patient, persevering, and teaching your child the right thing to do – over and over and over again – will make her better understand right from wrong. And letting her cry herself to sleep, even though it might be painful to hear, will be better for everyone in the long run.

Patience can help your startup and business succeed as well. Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) investor and expert Jason Lemkin says it typically takes 7+ years to truly build a SaaS company. And many founders give up too soon.

It takes some time to learn what you need to learn and do the things you need to do in order to be successful. At least that’s what I keep telling myself.

But when might too much patience and perseverance be a bad thing?

In the sleep training example, maybe your kid is crying for a different reason other than just not being soothed to sleep. She may have poo’d or pee’d, maybe you forgot to give her favorite sleeping toy to her, or it might be too cold in the room. If too much time has passed and she still isn’t sleeping, you should probably go in and check on her.

In the startup world, you have to realize when it’s time to jump ship. You might recognize that the founding team isn’t right for you, and it makes sense to split up. Maybe you see that no one really needs or wants your product, and it’s time to pivot to another idea.

In these cases, you might be wasting your time pursuing things that just aren’t going to work, and the best solution is to not persevere and just move on.

Overall, patience and perseverance are great characteristics to have. But the tough part is recognizing when they are detrimental to your particular situation.

OpenTable vs. Yelp for restaurant reviews – what I learned from making dinner reservations

restaurant_interior

When you’re looking for restaurant reviews, where do you go?

I think most of you would say Yelp. I tend to do the same.

But earlier this week, while I was searching for a restaurant to make a rezzie for Valentine’s Day, I realized that OpenTable has SO MANY MORE reviews than Yelp. Did you know that?

For Rural Society (where we’re going on Tuesday – have you been?), Yelp has 280 reviews, while OpenTable has more than two times the number, 571.

For Woodward Table, Yelp has 370 reviews, while OpenTable has 1136! More than 3x!

For Art and Soul, Yelp has 719 reviews and OpenTable has 3840! That’s more than 5x!

What’s going on here?

The questions I pondered were:

  1. Why is Yelp so much more top of mind than OpenTable when looking for restaurant ratings and reviews?
  2. Why does OpenTable have so many more reviews?
  3. Which site should I trust more when looking for restaurant reviews?

Why is Yelp so much more top of mind than OpenTable when looking for restaurant ratings and reviews?

This is the case because Yelp’s primary reason for existence is to provide reviews of local businesses, primarily restaurants, to its users.

One the other hand, OpenTable’s main use case is to make reservations, and the reviews are a secondary feature.

Thus, Yelp is able to focus on communicating its core value proposition of restaurant ratings and reviews. So when they run online or TV ads, they can focus on how they have real reviews from real people. Then when their users talk about their app, they’ll use the same jargon.

That focus can be a very powerful thing in staying top of mind and acquiring users.

Why does OpenTable have so many more reviews?

The reason why OpenTable has so many more reviews is simple – because they own the transaction of making reservations.

People primarily use Yelp to research restaurants they might eat at. And while you can make reservations through Yelp (they actually had a partnership with OpenTable for years to do so), this is a secondary offering. There are relatively few transactions that happen on Yelp.

You use OpenTable to transact, and that’s a very powerful place for them to be. In order to make a rezzie, you need to sign up and login. Then they can capture and store your info and restaurant preferences, and deliver deals and specials to you.

And because they own that transaction, they are able to prompt you for a review after each time you’ve gone to a restaurant, which is why they have so many more reviews than Yelp.

Owning the transaction was one of the primary reasons why Unilever spent $1 billion to acquire Dollar Shave Club.

Because Unilever typically sold their products through supermarkets and drug stores, they had no relationship with the end customer. They had no idea who was buying their product and how often. On the other hand, Dollar Shave Club had tons of information about their customers’ buying habits.

Apparently, that’s worth a lot of money.

Which site should I trust more when looking for restaurant reviews?

This is an interesting question.

Yelp has done a great job recruiting reviewers who write very in-depth, comprehensive reviews of their experiences. Most Yelp reviews are multiple paragraphs long and many include images. On the other hand, the reviews on OpenTable are typically much shorter and less detailed.

But with Yelp, you can only give a single star rating, which represents the overall experience with your meal. On OpenTable, you can provide ratings for food, ambiance, service, and value, which give the reader a more multi-faceted profile of the dining experience. Both are on a scale of 1-5, which I really hate. It doesn’t give the reviewer enough of a range to give a meaningful rating; I prefer 1-7. Just sayin.

And the amount of reviews! Yelp has significantly fewer reviews per restaurant than OpenTable. If you’re a proponent of the wisdom of the crowds, OpenTable is the place to be.

And from a small sample size that I looked at, it seems like the ratings on Yelp, on average, are lower than that of OpenTable. Are Yelpers more discerning? I’m not sure.

Conclusion

I found it very interesting when I discovered that OpenTable had so many more reviews.

From this discovery, I came to two conclusions.

Yelp will probably still be the first place I look when searching for restaurant reviews, but I think I’ll also refer to OpenTable’s reviews for more context.

I also realized how valuable owning the transaction is for a business; in this case, for amassing a high volume of reviews. OpenTable has a great business where restaurants pay them for every reservation made by a diner, and they are certainly the market leader when it comes to online restaurant reservations.

And even though reviews are a secondary feature of the platform, they are extremely valuable. OpenTable has done a great job in amassing so many more reviews than Yelp. And I think if they wanted to highlight their restaurant reviews to garner more traffic and go head-on against Yelp, they can certainly do so effectively.

Funny how much you can learn from making dinner reservations, huh?

Photo courtesy of Tzahy Lerner on Wikimedia Commons

How My Cognizance and Awareness Has Improved Over Time

I think one of the “skills” that has markedly improved over time is my cognizance.

I’m much more cognizant and aware of what I’m doing and saying, how I’m doing and saying these things, how what I do and say might affect others, and how those things, in turn, will affect me.

Maybe it’s a function of being older and more mature (my maturity is debatable, though). It might also be my exposure to different types of work, people, and experiences over time.

I believe that being an entrepreneur has truly humbled me and made me much more aware of my strengths and weaknesses.

When you work for a larger company, you can more easily cover up your shortcomings. When you work for yourself, a startup, or a small business, your weaknesses can become much more exposed if you fail to deliver, because your impact is much greater, for better or for worse.

I think producing my podcast really taught me to be concise, speak clearly, ask good questions, and be aware of how these questions might be interpreted. I’ve learned how to manage different personalities under specific constraints and get the most out of every minute of a short conversation.

And in my personal life, I believe having a child really puts things into perspective and forces me to think things through before making any major moves. It also compels me to be more productive and maximize the use of my free time, since there’s much less of it now.

I believe that the people I’ve met, the work that I’ve done, and the experiences that I’ve accrued have helped me better understand and be more aware of my surroundings and actions.

How about you? Do you believe that you’ve become more cognizant? If so, why?

How is your work judged – by hours, output, or results?

There are many ways to judge how well someone is doing their job, but I’ve been thinking about three primary ones – hours, output, and results – and the impact they have on each other.

Hours

If you’re judged on hours, you likely have to show up at an office, log your time, and directly trade time for money.

Lawyers and consultants are judged this way, where billable hours and utilization are the main metrics. These firms charge their clients some crazy amount for each hour of their employees’ time, so it makes sense to maximize the number of hours worked.

Another form of being judged by hours is how big corporations do it.

These large organizations force you to work in the office from 9-5 and as long as you show your face and maybe get some work done, you’re all good. Many times it doesn’t really matter how much work has been done in that time, as long as the time gets logged. Ever see Office Space? You know what I’m talking about.

Output

Being assessed by output is different, of course.

If you’re a sales rep, you may be judged on the amount of sales calls you make or appointments you book.

If you’re a content marketer, you may be assessed by the number of blog posts you publish.

Software developer? Your main metric might be how many lines of code you create.

Judging by output is certainly better than assessing by time spent, as there is evidence that work has been done.

Results

Results is where the rubber meets the road.

If you’re a lawyer, did you win or lose the case?

If you’re a consultant, did your strategy get implemented, and was it effective? How did it impact your clients’ bottom line?

If you’re a sales rep, how much revenue did your sales calls bring in, and what is your win rate?

Nearly every job can be measured by results, which is the best measure of effectiveness. Unfortunately not every company chooses to do so.

The interaction between hours, output, and results

These three criteria don’t exist in their own vacuums.

High output can potentially lead to great results.

More blog posts written can lead to better search engine optimization (assuming the posts are high quality), which can lead to more web traffic and sales.

More sales calls can lead to more revenue. Even if you have a low win rate, the more calls you make, the more deals you may be able close.

While more code may not necessarily mean better software, the more code you write, the better you’ll get at software development, which will lead to better software.

And if you work hard, create a lot of output, and see good results, you may enjoy your work more and create even more output.

But more hours won’t necessarily lead to more output or better results.

A law firm can pile on the hours and still lose the case. A consulting firm can deploy a ton of consultants’ time and come up with the wrong solution.

And it’s these companies that judge effectiveness on hours worked that are being disrupted. The consulting industry is undergoing change, while the legal industry is in decline.

On a personal level, more hours may be detrimental to your output and results, as you might burn out and wind up hating your job.

So take a moment and think about how your work is being judged, and whether you want to be assessed in that manner.

If not, what will you do about it?

The uncertainty of launching a startup product

compass

When you’re building a product for your very early stage startup, there will always be uncertainty. The weird thing is that it can come in different forms.

I’ve been part of building two startup products, even though they didn’t get very far. One was a smart calendar called Dokkit and the other is ribl. In both cases, I could envision exactly what the product would look like from the jump.

The uncertainty in Dokkit came when our team couldn’t quite agree on the product vision after building the alpha version. Everyone had their own ideas. We didn’t talk to enough potential users and didn’t validate what we needed to build. The end of Dokkit came shortly after that.

With ribl, the uncertainty reared its ugly head when trying to acquire customers after product launch. Again, we didn’t do enough to validate the concept, primarily because we had such a clear vision of the product and we were absolutely enamored with the idea. Big mistake.

Now I’m working on WinOptix and have spoken with a bunch of government contractors about their business development processes to thoroughly test the validity of the concept before building anything.

And unlike Dokkit and ribl, the ambiguity now comes in the form of not knowing what to build.

I’m hearing some excellent feedback about the government contracting BD world and the multitude of problems that exist. And one of those problems aligns with my initial hypothesis of what WinOptix might do.

But are the other problems mentioned bigger issues for my potential users?

Have I truly validated anything?

When do I start building something?

And what the hell do I build?

All of this uncertainty is stressful. I might make the wrong choice and waste time and money building something no one wants. That’s a startup killer.

But it’s exciting, too, because I’m confident that there are problems to be solved here. It’s just a matter of finding out which one will have the most impact. And it’s just more interesting than any other problems I’ve faced in other jobs. :)

Uncertainty is inherent in startups, and it can come in all forms. But that’s the exciting part, and I can’t wait to find my way through it all.

Under-promise and over-deliver – what a crock

“Under-promise and over-deliver” – I hate that saying and never understood why anyone uses it.

So you’re going to set low expectations and when you surpass them, yay! Everyone will be happy!

What a crock of shit.

What about setting realistic expectations? Or even setting stretch goals? Don’t you think that will make you work harder to achieve more?

Which situation is better:

  1. Setting a deadline of a month to complete a blog post, and completing it on time, or
  2. Setting a deadline of a week for that blog post, but completing it 3 days late?

If you’re a believer of under-promising and over-delivering, then you’d go with #1.

If you just want to get more shit done, then you’d go with #2.

I understand the importance of managing expectations, especially working with clients.

But intentionally under-promising on deadlines and deliverables for the purpose of over-delivering on them is pretty weak.

I think setting realistic expectations and even including stretch goals is the best way to go. Then, of course, delivering on your promises.

Sorry, rant over!

What are your thoughts about under-promising and over-delivering? I’d love to hear from you in the comments.

I hope you found this interesting! If so, please share this article with the share buttons on the left and then sign up for my mailing list below.

Thanks for reading!

 

3 types of communities that are crucial for a startup’s growth

Communities have been an enduring theme on my podcast and have been crucial to the growth of many of my guests’ businesses.

While I’ve taken a break from podcasting, I continue to listen to past episodes and learn from my guests, and it’s no doubt how important communities are to their success.

Being involved with or building a community can be an extremely valuable way to engage with people who may later turn into customers, partners, and friends.

No matter what stage your business is in – whether you’re just brainstorming ideas or in the millions of revenue – there will be communities that can help move you ahead.

Let’s see what these types of communities are and how they can help.

Startup communities blog image

Local startup and industry communities

The first community that is very important when you’re launching a company is the community of startup founders, entrepreneurs, and industry professionals in your city or neighborhood.

For instance, if you’re a web designer in Raleigh, NC working on a financial technology startup, you should be part of and contribute to communities that focus on web design, fintech, and the general tech startup scene.

Being part of a local startup ecosystem can be a very powerful thing on many levels.

First, you’ll have a bunch of like-minded people with whom you can learn from and share your issues and concerns while you all are building businesses.

Regardless of whether you’re a solopreneur or part of a team, it’s always good to have an outsider’s perspective and an alternative point of view to solve your problem.

There is so much to do and to learn, and helping each other through the thick and thin is a valuable experience.

Next, you may be able to leverage your local network in order to gain customers.

Many of these entrepreneurs and small businesses are looking for products and services that you offer, and having that existing relationship gives you a foot in the door to make a sale.

You certainly want to add value before you drop the sales pitch on others, and being known as someone who gives before she gets is a great thing for business.

Finally, being part of the local entrepreneurship ecosystem opens the doors to many other networks, whether they are local or abroad, or directly related to your business or not.

By expanding your network, you may be introduced to future investors, partners, customers, and many others who may be able to help your business on one way or another.

If you’re a designer in search of a marketer, someone from your local network just may have a contact who is looking for that opportunity.

If your startup is ramping up and you’re in search for investors, a local entrepreneur may know just the person looking to make a bet.

As you can see, being part of your local entrepreneurial ecosystem can be extremely beneficial. But of course, it’s important to give before you get.

Volunteer your time at Meetups you’re interested in, provide some services for free, and be supportive of others in the community. Be known as someone who gives to the community and you’ll eventually receive benefits in spades.

Local communities are frequently spoken about on my podcast.

In episode 10, I chatted with Ron Schmelzer, the CEO of TechBreakfast, which is the largest monthly morning tech Meetup in the nation. If you’re into the technology scene, TechBreakfast events are great places to meet people like you.

In episode 14, Alec Hartman talked about how he is helping to grow New York’s tech scene by building TechDay.

In episode 16, founder Andrew Hyde and then CEO Marc Nager talked about how they launched and grew Startup Weekend to be a global phenomenon. Startup Weekend was one of the primary factors why I became an entrepreneur.

As you can see, there is no shortage of startup communities. No matter where you live, I’m sure that there will be a local startup or industry community waiting to welcome you, and being a part of these can pay off big time down the road.

Existing online communities

Existing online communities are the digital equivalent of your local community. The fundamentals of how they work are essentially the same, with the activity occurring on your laptop or mobile phone instead of in person.

Online communities will allow you to ask questions and garner answers from experts, provide your opinion and expertise to help others, make connections you wouldn’t have made otherwise, and potentially gain new customers.

But just like in local communities, you have to make sure to give before you receive. Blatantly promoting your wares won’t work, and doing so may get you banished from some of these sites. So make sure that you add value before extracting it from these online communities.

There are many community sites where you can interact with other like-minded people.

Reddit is the first to come to mind.

Reddit

There are hundreds of thousands of “subreddits” (topic-based forums on Reddit), where people gather to share articles and discuss and debate different subjects.

Going back to that example of a web designer in Raleigh, NC working on a financial technology startup, you can join the r/web_design (153,000+ subscribers), r/startups, (109k+), r/fintech (1k+), and even r/raleigh (10K+) subreddits to have a huge built-in audience to engage with immediately.

For more info on how to market on Reddit, check out this post.

Facebook Groups are amazing resources as well.

When I started my podcast, I joined podcasting Facebook Groups like Podcasters’ Hangout and Podcast Community. I interacted with hundreds of fellow podcasters each day, learned from them, and picked up a bunch of listeners and reviews.

Quora is another great community in which to engage. Quora is the best question-and-answer site on the web, and many smart people ask and answer questions that span all kinds of topics. You can search for and share your knowledge about thousands of different subjects. It’s a great place to both learn and teach.

Build your own community

One of the best ways to engage your customers for a long period of time is to build your own community.

No matter whether you build your community in the real world, online, or both, you’ll have a population of people who want to hear from and engage with your content and offerings.

Again, the keys here are to offer value, give before you get, and don’t always sell.

In episode 1, John Von Tetzchner, the founder of web browser companies Opera and Vivaldi, built passionate communities around these web browsers.

At Opera, Von Tetzchner built the MyOpera community to a scale of 35 million visitors per month at its height. The users frequently gave feedback on the product, and many volunteers contributed their time to testing unfinished products.

At Vivaldi, John was able to build a community from many Opera users who shared the sentiment he did – that Opera was becoming more of a commodity browser and he believed that browser users needed something more powerful.

So he developed online forums that potential users could join to talk about what they wanted from a new browser. The company engaged this community and frequently asked them for feedback as they developed the new browser, which gave the community a sense of empowerment and connection.

In episode 12, Luis Congdon talked about how his private Facebook Group has helped him grow his podcasting audience and sell a lot of his product, a podcasting launch course called The Podcaster’s Secret Weapon.

I am a member of Luis’ Facebook group and I must say that he does a great job engaging and providing lots of value to his audience without being overt about selling his products. And even when he does push his products, he does it in such a way that helps his constituents.

Conclusion

As you can see, communities are critical to the growth of businesses.

Regardless of whether you’re just at the idea stage, in the process of building your product, or have sold millions in revenue, being part of or building a community can help you engage potential or current customers and partners and set yourself up for success.

What are some ways you’ve leveraged communities to move your business forward? I’d love to hear from you in the comments.

I hope you found this interesting! If so, please share this article with the share buttons on the left and then sign up for my mailing list below.

Thanks for reading!

Focus, Discipline, and Consistency – my three goals for 2017

Happy New Year!

I didn’t make any resolutions for 2016, and I still won’t make any for 2017.

What I’m going to do is be as focused, disciplined, and consistent as I possibly can in everything that I do.

Let’s see what I mean.

Focus

I want to be more focused on both a macro and micro level.

On a macro level, I want to do fewer things, better.

That’s why I stopped producing my podcast. As much as I loved interviewing entrepreneurs every week, the podcast wasn’t getting me closer to my goal of launching and growing a successful startup.

So the time and mindshare that was spent on producing the podcast are now dedicated to working on my startup (more about my startup at a later time).

I’m still going to be involved with Startup Weekend, but I’ll limit my time on that as well.

On a micro level, I want to increase my focus on the task at hand, whether said task is for work or personal life.

When I’m working, I will minimize distractions from email, social media, and any other interruptions that come my way. I’ll dedicate specific times to check my email and limit my time on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media.

On the personal side, I just want to be more present in everything I do. For example, if I’m hanging out with my daughter, I’ll truly focus my attention on her instead of checking my phone every 10 minutes. I’ll concentrate on the people I’m with and the task at hand. It sounds simple, but in today’s world of technology all around us, I need to make that conscious effort to stay focused.

Focus is so crucial, and I aim to be more intentional about it in everything that I do.

Discipline

I’m going to work hard at being disciplined with my time and energy.

To do so, I’m going to schedule everything. All of my work tasks will be inputted into my calendar and assigned a specific time allotment. This will help me avoid Parkinson’s Law – where work will expand to fill the time available for its completion.

I’m also going to be more disciplined in my diet and exercise regimen. Vicky and I are starting our ketosis diet again, and I aim to exercise at least a little bit every day, whether that’s an hour at the gym or 15 minutes of push-ups and sit-ups.

Consistency

Finally, I’ll work hard to create a consistent cadence in everything I do.

On the work front, I’ll do a little bit every day to achieve my long term goals.

This might mean writing every day to consistently create blog posts for my role at Thorn Technologies, working on small tasks each night on my startup, or perform targeted engagement every day on social media sites.

In my personal life, this might mean working on a home project each week or being consistent in cleaning up the house.

Consistency is critical if you want to constantly get better and improve.

Conclusion

Focus, discipline, and consistency are my three goals for 2017 and beyond.

They’re not mutually exclusive, either.

It takes lots of focus to be disciplined, and lots of discipline to be focused and consistent.

If I can increase my focus, discipline, and consistency, 2017 is going to be my most productive year yet. And I believe I’ll improve my skills and relationships as well.

Let’s see how this goes!

What are your resolutions for 2017? Do you have enough focus, discipline, and consistency in all you do?

I’d love to hear from you. Write your thoughts in the comments, tweet at me @mikewchan, or email me at mike@mikewchan.com.

Are you patient enough?

I was going through the airport security checkpoint this morning and the man in front of me (I’ll call him “Dude”) looked really impatient.

The guy in front of him (I’ll call him “Guy”) wasn’t even moving that slowly. He was doing the typical things – taking off his shoes, putting his luggage on the conveyor, etc. – at a normal pace.

Dude was rolling his eyes, trying to move in front of Guy, and just being kind of pissy.

We walked through the metal detector and gathered our belongings. Dude was rushing and walked off while I grabbed my stuff.

When I looked up, I saw that Dude left his suitcase on the conveyor. I called to him and he had to walk back to grab his bag.

His impatience made him forget something really important and necessary.

(I thought about the fact that he might be late for his flight, but I found out he was on my flight, which wasn’t taking off for a while.)

This can happen to anyone. We’re all busy and have places to go, and we want to get there as fast as possible.

I admit I’ve been impatient when it comes to the startups I’ve been working on.

In the startup world, you’re supposed to “move fast and break things.”

You’re supposed to “fail fast”, “hire fast and fire fast”, talk fast, run fast, blah blah blah.

And I get impatient when progress isn’t made each and every day.

Maybe I need to better understand that things take time to develop.

For my first startup, I was impatient when things weren’t progressing. It failed for a number of reasons, but I think one of them was due to my impatience of things not moving fast enough. And I left some relationships behind.

I think moving fast is very important. In an ideal world, you’ll make quick decisions, build quickly, iterate, learn faster, and move forward.

But sometimes you need to understand that things take time, and some of the best products and companies take years and years to find success.

If you move too fast, you might leave things behind.

Have you ever left something behind because you were too impatient? Talk to me in the comments!

I hope you found this interesting! If so, please share this article with the share buttons on the left! That’d be awesome of you.

The importance of understanding your weaknesses – Chris Sacca on TWIST

Chris Sacca and Matt Mazzeo

Chris Sacca and Matt Mazzeo on TWIST — Photo courtesy of TWIST

I recently listened to part 1 of an interview with Chris Sacca and Matt Mazzeo of Lowercase Capital on This Week in Startups.

If you’re not aware, Lowercase Capital is one of the most successful seed stage investment firms in existence. Chris and Matt have invested in companies like Twitter, Uber, Stripe, Kickstarter, and many, many more.

The interview was really insightful and interesting. One of the things that stood out to me was when Chris said that he passed on Snapchat because he thought it was only about dick pics. When he told Matt that he passed, Matt was livid because he was a Snapchat user and thought it was an amazing product.

Chris is a little older, has a family, and thus has never swiped right or left (i.e. never used Tinder).

He isn’t in tune with the new ways that people are interacting with apps and each other.

This made Chris realize that his strength isn’t in taking the first meeting with a startup. He doesn’t “get” many of the products that are targeted toward millennials and younger people, so he’s not a good judge of whether he should invest in them.

Thus, he relies on Matt to judge those potential investments.

I love how one of the most successful investors in the world can openly admit his weaknesses and even more importantly, bring in people who can complement those shortcomings.

I think many times ego gets in the way and entrepreneurs (or anyone, really) think they can do it all.

Continuing to learn and understand new concepts is powerful, but sometimes you just have to realize that you can’t improve certain weaknesses enough. So you need to bring in additional resources and share the responsibility.

If one of the most successful investors in the world can be introspective enough to identify his weaknesses, everyone can.

It’s a powerful thing.

Have you identified your weaknesses, and if so, how have you dealt with them? Talk to me in the comments!

I hope you found this interesting! If so, please share this article with the share buttons on the left! That’d be awesome of you.